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In Architecture in Translation, Esra Akcan offers a way to understand the global circulation of culture that extends the notion of translation beyond language to visual fields. She shows how members of the ruling Kemalist elite in Turkey further aligned themselves with Europe by.
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Akcan has also participated in exhibitions by carrying her practice beyond writing to visual media. She was educated as an architect in Turkey and received her Ph.

Architecture in Translation. Germany, Turkey & The Modern House

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  1. A Russian reader Pisma. Fyodor Dostoyevsky: Vocabulary in English, Explanatory notes in English, Essay in English (illustrated, annotated);
  2. Forward March.
  3. Architecture in Translation: Germany, Turkey, and the Modern House.
  4. Architecture in Translation: Germany, Turkey, and the Modern House - Esra Akcan - Google книги;
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Akcan, Esra. Architecture in Translation: Germany, Turkey, and the modern house.

Hilary Yeung December 18, December 18, While many associated sources focus on this history as either a matter of irony or amid broader critiques of the Kemalist state's agenda for modernization, Esra Akcan's Architecture in Translation provides a new approach to engaging with and analyzing this account of visualizing and assembling a nationalist landscape of and for modern Turkey. Focusing not on the paradox of an ultranationalist polity looking abroad amid its construction of sites and symbols, Akcan instead approaches this history with a goal to interrogate the experience of exchanges of ideas, information, images, and particular key actors between Turkey and Europe; she refers to these flows as "translations" in order to emphasize the cultural and reciprocal dynamics of such interactions.


  1. Architecture in Translation by Esra Akcan | Translations | Jacques Derrida.
  2. Learning By His Light?
  3. The Sight of You.

Introducing associated concepts of "smooth translatability" and "untranslatability," Architecture in Translation thus enables us to better problematize the nature of such flows and exchanges by revealing how they are processes fraught with obstacles, oversights, and agency. In particular, Akcan focuses on historicizing the invention of the "Turkish house" as both ideal and icon.

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Tracing its lineage, in large part, to Germany's early twentieth-century garden city ideals, this form of mass housing—also associated with the promotion of abundant green space—was ubiquitous in many plans for further developing the early republic's cities. Enabling this ambitious inquiry into the hybrid and sometimes contentious character of housing and city development, Akcan's archival research spans collections located in thirteen cities in six different countries.

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Following the elaboration on the theme of translation and its theoretical underpinnings, the first chapter of the book examines how this problem of translatability was embedded in the notion of a garden city well before it arrived in Turkey. Noting the concept's origins in late nineteenth-century England and its subsequent rendering in the German context, Akcan details how the model was imbued with additional meanings and values.

In Germany, and over the course of almost two decades, this garden city ideal developed further, and planners like Hermann Jansen who drafted the master plan for greater Berlin and later drew plans for much of early republican Ankara later came to Turkey steeped in this already hybridized tradition.